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  1. Key details 1 item
    1. This core module aims to explore significant methodologies and conceptual frameworks which are central to the study of audio-visual media. The module will be divided into four sections engaging with issues concerning: textual analysis; television; theoretical paradigms; film style and history. The module provides a grounding in key concepts and methods, but will also encourage an advanced level of reflection on the key areas addressed. The module is taught through a combination of screenings, presentations, reading and discussion and this document details the work for each week, the required and suggested further reading and viewing, and assessment.

       

      Dr Tiago de Luca (convenor)

      Dr James Taylor

      Ms Zoe Shacklock

      Dr Rick Wallace

       

      Assessment

      The assessment for this module consists of a portfolio of three pieces of work of 2,000 words in length, each relating to the three sections of the module. (Details and questions at the bottom of this document)

  2. Autumn Term 189 items
    1. Week 1: Introductory session 49 items
      All tutors.
      1. Screening 2 items
        1. All That Heaven Allows (1955) Friday, 19 Apr 2013

          Audio-visual document essential

        2. All that heaven allows - Jane Wyman, Rock Hudson, Agnes Moorehead, Conrad Nagel 2007 (videorecording)

          Audio-visual document essential

      2. Further Viewing 3 items
        1. Ali, fear eats the soul - Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Brigitte Mira, El Hedi Ben Salem, Barbara Valentin 2003 (videorecording)

          Book recommended

        2. Far from Heaven (2002) Monday, 28 Nov 2011

          Audio-visual document recommended

        3. If you are not yet familiar with Sirk's film, or have not viewed it recently, then it is advisable to watch it over the summer. It is widely available. All 4 tutors will be participating in this first week, looking at All That Heaven Allows from different perspectives.

           

           

          James Taylor will look closely at one sequence of All That Heaven Allows, considering how it presents the film's world and invites us to read it. Zoë Shacklock will reflect upon the role of the theorist and critic in establishing norms of cultural value. Tiago de Luca will consider the ways in which the film and Sirk's style have been variously constituted in different critical and theoretical frameworks across film history. Rick Wallace will explore the depiction of television within the film, examining television's status as a domestic medium. He will also spend some time thinking about what happens to films when they appear on television.

      3. Required reading 4 items
        1. Mise-en-scène: film style and interpretation - John Edward Gibbs c2002 (electronic resource)

          Book  Please read: John Gibbs, ‘Mise-en-scène and Melodrama’, pp. 67-82. It is also recommended to read the first chapter of this book (pp. 5-26), if you have time. It is a short introduction to many key elements of cinematic construction, and the ways in which they can contribute to a film’s meaning.

      4. Further reading 40 items
        1. On Douglas Sirk in Film Theory 6 items
          1. Douglas Sirk, aesthetic modernism and the culture of modernity - Victoria L. Evans 2017

            Book further reading

          2. Conversations with Jon Halliday - Jon Halliday 1997

            Webpage further reading

          3. Visual and other pleasures - Laura Mulvey 2008

            Book further reading Please read: Chapter 5: ‘Notes on Sirk and Melodrama’.

          4. Death 24x a second: stillness and the moving image - Laura Mulvey 2006

            Book further reading

          5. Looks and frictions: essays in cultural studies and film theory - Paul Willemen, British Film Institute 1994

            Book further reading Please read: Chapter 3.

          6. Imitations of life: a reader on film & television melodrama - Marcia Landy c1991

            Book further reading Please read: Thomas Elsaesser (1991) ‘Tales of Sound and Fury: Observations on the Family Melodrama’.

        2. On mise-en-scène 4 items
          1. Style and meaning: studies in the detailed analysis of film - John Gibbs, Douglas Pye 2005

            Book further reading Please read: John Gibbs and Douglas Pye, ‘Introduction’, pp. 1-15.

          2. Close viewings: an anthology of new film criticism - Peter Lehman c1990

            Book further reading Please read: Mary Beth Haralovich, ‘All that Heaven Allows: Color, Narrative Space, and Melodrama’, pp. 57-72.

          3. Style and meaning: studies in the detailed analysis of film - John Gibbs, Douglas Pye 2005

            Book further reading Please read: Laura Mulvey (2005), ‘Repetition and Return: Textual Analysis and Douglas Sirk in the Twenty-first Century', pp. 228-243.

          4. The Cine-Files

            Website further reading • Special issue of online journal The Cine-Files devoted to mise-en-scène. Of particular relevance here are the articles by a number of ‘guest scholars’ which either undertake close textual analysis or engage productively with the theory of close textual analysis and interpretation.

        3. On Television and Domesticity 14 items
          1. (It is likely that almost any writing on television that you will read will include some discussion of its domestic character, either directly or implied. Outlined below, however, are a few key texts which have the relationship between television and domesticity at their hearts.)

          2. The age of television: experiences and theories - Milly Buonanno c2008

            Book further reading Particularly Chapter 1: The Age of Television, pp. 11-26.

          3. Critical ideas in television studies - John Corner 1999

            Book further reading Particularly Chapter 8: Reception, pp. 80-92.

          4. Visible fictions: cinema, television, video - John Ellis 1992

            Book further reading Particularly Chapter 7: Broadcast TV as Cultural Form, pp. 111-127 and Chapter 10: The Broadcast TV Viewer, pp. 160-172.

          5. Uses of television - John Hartley 1999

            Book further reading

          6. Family television: cultural power and domestic leisure - David Morley 1988, ©1986

            Book further reading Particularly Chapter 1: Understanding the Uses of Television, pp. 13-17 and Chapter 2: Television in the Family, pp. 18-39.

          7. Popular television in Britain: studies in cultural history - John Corner 1991

            Book further reading Please read: Tim O’Sullivan, ‘Television Memories and Cultures of Viewing, 1950-65’, pp. 159-81.

          8. Locating television: zones of consumption - Anna Cristina Pertierra, Graeme Turner 2013

            Book further reading Please read: Particularly Chapter 4: Television, Domestic Space and the Moral Economy of the Family’, pp. 83-107.

          9. From receiver to remote control: the TV set - Matthew Geller, New Museum of Contemporary Art (New York, N.Y.) ©1990

            Book further reading Please read: Jane Root, ‘The Set in the Sitting Room’. pp. 45-47.

          10. Television and everyday life - Roger Silverstone 1994

            Book further reading

        4. On Films on Television 9 items
          1. All our yesterdays: 90 years of British cinema - Charles Barr, British Film Institute c1986

            Book further reading Please read: Charles Barr, ‘Broadcasting and Cinema: 2: Screen within screens’, pp. 206-24.

          2. All our yesterdays: 90 years of British cinema - Charles Barr, British Film Institute c1986

            Book further reading Please read: John Caughie, ‘Broadcasting and Cinema: 1: Converging histories’, pp. 189-205.

          3. Big picture, small screen: the relations between film and television - Martin McLoone, John Hill 1996

            Book further reading

          4. Lives of cinema: against its 'death' - N. Niessen 01/09/2011

            Article further reading

          5. The virtual life of film - David Norman Rodowick 2007

            Book further reading

          6. On screen rivals: cinema and television in the United States and Britain - Jane C. Stokes 1999

            Book further reading

        5. On Interstitials/Branding 2 items
          1. Ephemeral media: transitory screen culture from television to YouTube - Paul Grainge 2011

            Book further reading Please read: John Ellis, ‘Interstitials: how the ‘bits in between’ define the programmes’.

          2. Branding television - Catherine Johnson 2012

            Book further reading

        6. On Theory and Cultural Value 5 items
          1. Making Feminist Points - Sara Ahmed

            Webpage further reading

          2. Materialities of communication - Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Karl Ludwig Pfeiffer 1994

            Book further reading Please read: Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, ‘A Farewell to Interpretation’, pp. 389-402.

          3. Touching feeling: affect, pedagogy, performativity - Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick 2003

            Book further reading Please read: • Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, ‘Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or, You're So Paranoid, You Probably Think This Essay Is About You’, pp. 123-151.

    2. Weeks 2 and 3: Textual Analysis 21 items
      (James Taylor)
      1. Weeks 2 and 3 of the module will focus on developing, practising and reflecting on skills in textual analysis of the moving image with specific reference to film. Textual analysis is a key methodological approach in the disciplines of Film and Television Studies, and this part of the module will enable you to develop your skills in this area as well as providing the opportunity for critical reflection on this method of analysis. These weeks will test and extend your skills in the advanced analysis of film style and the practice of film criticism. Our workshops will consist of full screenings of the films, close analysis of clips, group discussions and detailed responses to set reading. Central issues to be considered will be the relationship between 'how' and 'what' in filmmaking, between describing and interpreting in film criticism, how to analyse tone and point of view, the ways in which subjective and objective criteria can shape our judgements of films, and the role of evaluation in film analysis.

      2. Week 2: Understanding and Practising Textual Analysis 10 items
        1. Screening 1 item
          1. Scarlet Street (1945) Thursday, 22 Dec 2011

            Audio-visual document essential

        2. Essential reading 2 items
          1. Guess-Work: Scarlet Street - Adrian Martin 2012

            Article essential

        3. Further reading 7 items
          1. The Movie book of film noir - Ian Cameron 1992

            Book further reading Please read: Florence Jacobowitz, ‘The Man’s Melodrama: The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street’, pp. 152-64.

          2. Style and meaning: studies in the detailed analysis of film - John Gibbs, Douglas Pye 2005

            Book further reading Please read: Andrew Klevan, ‘Notes on Teaching Film Style’, pp. 214-227.

          3. Mise en scène and film style: from classical Hollywood to new media art - Adrian Martin 2014

            Book further reading

          4. Close-up 02 - Douglas Pye, Jacob Leigh, Susan Smith 2007

            Book further reading Please read: Douglas Pye, ‘Movies and Tone’, pp. 1-80.

          5. Reading Hollywood: spaces and meanings in American film - Deborah Thomas 2001

            Book further reading

          6. Narration in light: studies in cinematic point of view - George M. Wilson 1986

            Book further reading

          7. Personal views: explorations in film - Robin Wood 2006

            Book further reading Please read: • Robin Wood, ‘Big Game: Confessions of a Reconstructed Humanist’, pp. 17-42. This chapter complements and challenges Perkins in interesting and compelling ways.

      3. Week 3: Textual Analysis and Film Criticism 10 items
        1. Screening 1 item
          1. Fargo - Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, William H. Macy, Frances McDormand 2004 (videorecording)

            Audio-visual document essential

        2. Essential reading 2 items
          1. Obvious mysteries in Fargo - Goerge Toles 1999

            Article essential Please download the pdf from this link so that we can refer to page numbers in class.

        3. Further Reading 7 items
          1. Britton on film: the complete film criticism of Andrew Britton - Andrew Britton, Barry Keith Grant c2009

            Book further reading Please read: Andrew Britton, ‘In Defense of Criticism’, pp. 383-387.

          2. On criticism - Noël Carroll 2009

            Book further reading

          3. The Coen brothers' Fargo - William Luhr 2004

            Book further reading Please read: Pamela Grace, ‘Motherhood, Homicide and Swedish Meatballs: The Quiet Triumph of the Maternal in Fargo’, 33-54.

          4. The language and style of film criticism - Alex Clayton, Andrew Klevan 2011

            Book further reading Please read: Andrew Klevan, ‘Description’, pp. 70-86.

          5. Please read: V.F. Perkins, ‘Must We Say What They Mean? Film Criticism and Interpretation’ 1990

            Article further reading Please read: V.F. Perkins, ‘Must We Say What They Mean? Film Criticism and Interpretation’, 34, 1990, pp. 1-6.

          6. Film as film: understanding and judging movies - V. F. Perkins 1972

            Book further reading Please read: ‘The Limits of Criticism’, pp. 187-194

          7. Film theory: an introduction - Robert Stam 2000

            Book further reading Please read: Robert Stam, ‘Interpretation and its Discontents’, pp. 192-201.

    3. Weeks 4 and 5: Television 50 items
      Rick Wallace
      1. Week 4 will discuss classic theories of the television text and their applicability to our screenings and the ways that we watch television. Week 5 will concentrate on historiographical issues and methodologies specific to Television Studies. It is designed to help develop students' empirical research skills and to discuss the value of archival and other sources in contextualising television texts over time and examining the history of television viewing.

         

         

      2. Week 4: Television Textual Analysis: Flow, Convergence and Complexity 31 items
        1. Screenings 4 items
          1. Grayson Perry: Divided Britain Tuesday, 30 May 2017

            Audio-visual document essential

          2. House of cards [videorecording] - K. Spacey

            Audio-visual document essential Netflix, 2013-. (Available to watch on Netflix)

          3. ITV morning 'flow' (2017).

          4. This workshop will focus on: (1) discussion of classic theories of the television text (how television is formed, how we experience it textually) and their applicability to our screenings and the ways that we watch television; (2) questions about the ways in which television is changing and how media convergence might have impacted upon television aesthetics as well as its delivery and consumption.

        2. Essential reading 3 items
          1. Visible fictions: cinema, television, video - John Ellis 1992

            Book essential Please read: Chapter 7: Broadcast TV as Cultural Form, pp. 111-26 and (if you have time) Chapter 8: Broadcast TV as sound and image, pp. 127-44.

          2. Complex TV: the poetics of contemporary television storytelling - Jason Mittell 2015

            Book essential Please read: Chapter 1: Complexity in context, pp. 17-54.

        3. Important (if you have time) 2 items
          1. Television as a cultural forum: Implications for research∗ - Horace M. Newcomb, Paul M. Hirsch 06/1983

            Article recommended

        4. Further Reading 22 items
          1. Television as digital media - James Bennett, Niki Strange 2011

            Book further reading Please read: William Boddy, ‘“Is it TV yet?” The dislocated screens of television in a mobile digital culture’, pp. 76-101.

          2. The age of television: experiences and theories - Milly Buonanno c2008

            Book further reading Please read: Chapter 2 gives a very good precis of the ‘flow’ debate.

          3. New media: theories and practices of digitextuality - John Thornton Caldwell, Anna Everett 2003

            Book further reading Please read: John Thornton Caldwell, ‘Second-shift media aesthetics: programming, interactivity and user flows’, pp. 127-44.

          4. Critical ideas in television studies - John Corner 1999

            Book further reading Particularly the chapter on ‘Flow’.

          5. Television as digital media - James Bennett, Niki Strange 2011

            Book further reading Please read: Max Dawson, ‘Television's aesthetic of efficiency: convergence television and the digital short’, pp. 204-29.

          6. Regarding television: critical approaches : an anthology - E. Ann Kaplan c1983

            Book further reading Please read: Jane Feuer, ‘The concept of live television: ontology as ideology’, pp. 12-22.

          7. Television culture - John Fiske 2011

            Book further reading Please read: John Fiske, ‘Segmentation and flow’, pp. 99-104.

          8. The television studies book - Christine Geraghty, David Lusted 1998

            Book further reading Please read: Jostein Gripsrud, ‘Television, broadcasting, flow: key metaphors in TV theory’, pp. 17-32.

          9. Television as digital media - James Bennett, Niki Strange 2011

            Book further reading Please read: Jason Jacobs, ‘Television, Interrupted: Pollution or Aesthetic?’, pp. 255-80.

          10. Interpreting television - Karen Lury 2005

            Book further reading I hope you will have read this over the summer, but this text will be useful for this week’s work.

          11. The Netflix effect: technology and entertainment in the 21st century 2016

            Book further reading Please read: Casey J. McCormick, ‘“Forward is the Battle Cry”: Binge-Viewing Netflix’s House of Cards’, pp. 101-116.

          12. Logics of television: essays in cultural criticism - Patricia Mellencamp 1990

            Book further reading Please read: Margaret Morse, ‘An ontology of everyday distraction: the freeway, the mall, and television’, pp. 193-221.

          13. Television after TV: essays on a medium in transition - Lynn Spigel, Jan Olsson 2004

            Book further reading Please read: William Urrichio, ‘Television’s next generation: technology/interface culture/flow’, pp. 163-82.

          14. MediaSpace: place, scale, and culture in a media age - Nick Couldry, Anna McCarthy 2004

            Book further reading Please read: Mimi White, ‘The attractions of television: reconsidering liveness’, pp. 75-91.

          15. Television: technology and cultural form - Raymond Williams, Ederyn Williams 1990

            Book further reading

          16. Television is happening - Helen Wood 11/2007

            Article further reading

      3. Week 5: Issues in Television Historiography 2 items
        1. This week will concentrate on historiographical issues and methodologies specific to Television Studies. It is designed to help develop students' empirical research skills and to discuss the value of archival and other sources in contextualising television texts over time and examining the history of television viewing. We will look at approaches to and methods of researching television history. We will spend part of the session on a practical archive exercise in the library, and the rest of the day presenting results to the group. A detailed timetable for this session will be circulated in Week 4. It is essential that you have done the required reading for this week before the session.

        2. Screenings 1 item
          1. There will be no screening this week.

      4. Essential reading 3 items
        1. Re-viewing television history: critical issues in television historiography - Helen Wheatley 2007

          Book essential Please read: Helen Wheatley, ‘Introduction: Re-viewing Television Histories’, pp. 1-14.

        2. Installing the Television Set: Popular Discourses on Television and Domestic Space, 1948–1955 - Lynn Spigel 01/01/1988

          Article essential We will also be returning to the Lynn Spigel piece that you read in Week1, so it will be worth re-reading this.

      5. Further reading 13 items
        1. Popular television drama: critical perspectives - Jonathan Bignell, Stephen Lacey 2005

          Book further reading Please read: Julia Hallam, ‘Remembering Butterflies: the comic art of housework’, pp. 34-50.

        2. The television history book - Michele Hilmes 2003

          Book further reading

        3. Tele-visions: an introduction to studying television - Glen Creeber 2006

          Book further reading Please read: Jason Jacobs, ‘Television and history: investigating the past’, pp. 107-15.

        4. Feminism, domesticity and popular culture - Stacy Gillis, Joanne Hollows 2008

          Book further reading Please read: Rachel Moseley, ‘Marguerite Patten, television cookery and postwar British femininity’, pp. 17-31.

        5. Popular television in Britain: studies in cultural history - John Corner 1991

          Book further reading Please read: Tim O’Sullivan, ‘Television Memories and Cultures of Viewing 1950-1965’, pp. 159-81.

        6. History and the media - David Cannadine, University of London. Institute of Historical Research 2004

          Book further reading Please read: Jean Seaton, ‘Writing the history of broadcasting’, pp. 141-59.

        7. Atlas of emotion: journeys in art, architecture and film - Giuliana Bruno 2007

          Book further reading Please read: Giuliana Bruno, ‘A Geography of the Moving Image’. pp. 55-71.

    4. Week 6 1 item
      1. Reading week.

    5. Weeks 7 and 8: Theorising the Film and Television Text 32 items
      (Zoë Shacklock)
      1. These two weeks of the module will explore how theoretical frameworks can be used to make sense of screen media. These weeks are designed to give you the tools to reflect upon pre-conceived and dominant ideas about media texts and spectatorship. We will be focusing on how theoretical frameworks can open up new possibilities for understanding screen media texts, particularly in terms of questions of cultural value and identity politics.

      2. Week 7: What is Cinema? Reality and Movement 14 items
        1. This week we will explore how theoretical frameworks help us define, recognise, and evaluate screen texts, and what challenging the tenets of these frameworks might have to offer us as critics and scholars. In particular, we will be discussing established notions of reality and indexicality - or in other words, how we define the 'truth' of a screen text/experience. We will begin exploring alternatives to these ideas, namely questions of movement, embodiment, and the digital. Our screening for the week is Wong Kar-wai's The Grandmaster. You will be asked to read the film through Gunning's theory of the cinematic, and reflect upon the value of this approach.

        2. Screening 1 item
          1. Grandmaster [videorecording] - Kar Wai Wong

            Audio-visual document essential

        3. Essential Reading 2 items
        4. Further reading 10 items
          1. What is cinema? - André Bazin, Hugh Gray c2005

            Book further reading Please read: Andre Bazin, ‘The Ontology of the Photographic Image’ and ‘The Myth of Total Cinema’, pp. 9-22.

          2. Techniques of the observer: on vision and modernity in the nineteenth century - Jonathan Crary c1990

            Book further reading Please read: Jonathan Crary, ‘Modernity and the Problem of the Observer’, pp. 1-24.

          3. Afterimage - Visual Studies Workshop

            Journal further reading Please read: Jean Epstein, ‘On Certain Characteristics of Photogénie’ and ‘The Photogenic Element’, pp. 20-27.

          4. Film history as media archaeology: tracking digital cinema - Thomas Elsaesser 2016

            Book further reading Please read: Thomas Elsaesser, ‘Cinema, Motion, Energy, and Entropy’, pp. 301-330.

          5. Film theory: an introduction through the senses - Thomas Elsaesser, Malte Hagener 2010

            Book further reading Please read: Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener, ‘Digital Cinema and Film Theory – The Body Digital’, pp. 194-218.

          6. The virtual window: from Alberti to Microsoft - Anne Friedberg c2006

            Book further reading Please read: Anne Friedberg, ‘Introduction: The Virtual Window’, and ‘The Window’, pp. 26-48.

          7. Theory of film: the redemption of physical reality - Siegfried Kracauer 1965

            Book further reading Please read: Siegfried Kracauer, ‘The Establishment of Physical Existence’ and ‘Inherent Affinities’, pp. 41-74.

          8. The language of new media - Lev Manovich c2001

            Book further reading Please read: Lev Manovich, ‘Digital Cinema and the History of a Moving Image’, pp. 293-308.

          9. Death 24x a second: stillness and the moving image - Laura Mulvey 2006

            Book further reading Please read: Laura Mulvey, ‘The Index and the Uncanny: Life and Death in the Photograph’, pp. 54-66.

          10. Film theory: an introduction - Robert Stam 2000

            Book further reading Please read: Robert Stam, ‘The Phenomenology of Realism’, pp. 72-82.

      3. Week 8: What is Spectatorship? Affect and Sensation 17 items
        1. This week will draw from the ideas introduced in the previous week to explore screen spectatorship. We will be focusing on affect theory, a body of literature that has developed in the last two decades. The aim of the session is encourage you to question how you understand and evaluate your response to a screen text, and to consider the political value of finding new theoretical terms and evaluative criteria for spectatorship. Our screening for the week will focus on television, rather than film, and you will be encouraged to reflect upon how these ideas might intersect with questions of medium-specificity.

        2. Screening 1 item
          1. American gods [videorecording] - E. Browning

            Audio-visual document essential ‘Lemon Scented You’ (1:5) and ‘Come to Jesus’ (1:8), American Gods (Starz, 2017- )

        3. Essential reading 2 items
          1. Carnal thoughts: embodiment and moving image culture - Vivian Carol Sobchack c2004

            Book essential Please read: Vivian Sobchack, ‘What My Fingers Knew: The Cinesthetic Subject, or Vision in the Flesh’, pp. 53-84.

          2. The forms of the affects - Eugenie Brinkema 2014

            Book essential Please read: • Eugenie Brinkema, ‘Ten Points to Begin’ and ‘Film Theory's Absent Centre’, pp. 26-46.

        4. Further reading 13 items
          1. Televisuality: style, crisis, and authority in American television - John Thornton Caldwell c1995

            Book further reading Please read: John Thornton Caldwell, ‘Excessive Style: The Crisis of Network Television’, pp. 3-31.

          2. Film theory: an introduction through the senses - Thomas Elsaesser, Malte Hagener 2010

            Book further reading Please read: Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener, ‘Cinema as Skin – Body and Touch’, pp. 124-145.

          3. Media audiences: television, meaning and emotion - Kristyn Gorton c2009

            Book further reading Please read: Kristyn Gorton, ‘Desperately Seeking the Audience: Models of Audience Reception’ and ‘Theorising Emotion and Affect: Feminist Engagements’, pp. 11-25 and pp. 55-71.

          4. INVOKING AFFECT - Clare Hemmings 09/2005

            Article further reading

          5. The skin of the film: intercultural cinema, embodiment, and the senses - Laura U. Marks 2000

            Book further reading Please read: • Laura Marks, ‘The Memory of Touch’, pp. 127-193.

          6. A Disturbing Feast for the Senses - Angela Ndalianis 12/2015

            Article further reading

          7. Moving viewers: American film and the spectator's experience - Carl R. Plantinga c2009

            Book further reading Please read: Carl Plantinga, ‘The Sensual Medium’, pp. 112-139.

          8. Senses of cinema

            Journal further reading Please read: Anne Rutherford, ‘Cinema and Embodied Affect’, Senses of Cinema, 25 (2003).

          9. The cinematic body - Steven Shaviro 1993

            Book further reading Please read: Steven Shaviro, ‘Film Theory and Visual Fascination’, pp. 1-65.

          10. The affect theory reader - Melissa Gregg, Gregory J. Seigworth 2010

            Book further reading Please read: Gregory Siegworth and Melissa Gregg, ‘An Inventory of Shimmers’, pp. 1-28.

          11. Feeling, Emotion, Affect - Eric Shouse 2005

            Article further reading

          12. Film Bodies: Gender, Genre, and Excess - Williams, Linda ARCHIVE); Berkeley44.4 (Summer 1991

            Article further reading

    6. Weeks 9 and 10: Aspects of Film Style and History (Tiago de Luca) 36 items
      1. These two weeks of the module will focus on aspects of film style in relation to theoretical issues across history. They are designed to help students situate the film text within its specific context but also in relation to how it can be variously reconstituted in a variety of critical and filmic discourses over time and across different cultures. 

      2. Week 9: Ozu in Film Theory 13 items
        1. The film chosen for this exercise in the first week is Tokyo Story (1953), by Yasujiro Ozu. Considered 'too Japanese' at home but then revered in the West, Ozu's cinema is a fruitful case study to demonstrate how a certain style can be differently negotiated within an array of historically situated and culturally specific theoretical frameworks: as 'transcendental' (Schrader), 'parametric' (Bordwell), 'uniquely Japanese' (Burch) and 'anti-cinema' (Yoshida).

        2. Screening 1 item
          1. The Noriko trilogy - Yasujirō Ozu, Kōgo Noda, Yūharu Atsuta, Chishū Ryū c2004 (videorecording)

            Audio-visual document essential We will be watching: Tokyo Story (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953).

        3. Further Viewing 2 items
          1. Late Spring (1949) Thursday, 27 Sep 2012

            Audio-visual document recommended

          2. Late autumn - Yasujirō Ozu, Kōgo Noda, Setsuko Hara, Yōko Tsukasa 2006 (videorecording)

            Audio-visual document recommended

        4. Essential reading 3 items
          1. Ozu Yasujiro - N Burch

            Chapter further reading

          2. Transcendental style in film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer - Paul Schrader 1988

            Book essential Please read Chapter 1, pp. 17-38

        5. Further reading 6 items
          1. Japanese cinema: texts and contexts - Alastair Phillips, Julian Stringer 2007

            Book further reading Please read: Abé Mark Nornes (1997) ‘The Riddle of the Vase: Ozu Yasujiro’s Late Spring (1949)’.

          2. Classical Japanese cinema revisited - Catherine Russell c2011

            Book further reading Please read: Chapters 1 and 2.

          3. Ozu's Tokyo story - David Desser 1997

            Book further reading Please read: Introduction, pp. 1-24.

          4. Asian cinemas: a reader and guide - Dimitris Eleftheriotis, Gary Needham 2006

            Book further reading Please read: David Desser ‘A Filmmaker for All Seasons’, pp. 17-26.

          5. Ozu - Donald Richie 1974

            Book further reading

          6. Tokyo Story: The Ozu/Noda Screenplay - Yasujiro Ozu, Kogo Noda 2003

            Book further reading

      3. Week 10: Ozu and Slow Cinema 22 items
        1. The second week will look at the ways in which Ozu has influenced global film culture at large by considering a range of films made in the last 30 years that openly pays homage to the director, particularly Café Lumière, by Taiwanese filmmaker Hou Hsiao-hsien. It will further examine how Ozu has been recently rehabilitated in critical discourses surrounding the notion of 'slow cinema' and consider aspects of film style in relation to narrative pace and speed. 

        2. Screening 2 items
          1. Café Lumière - Hou Hsiao-hsien 2003

            Book essential

          2. Five Dedicated to Ozu - Abbas Kiarostami 2003

            Book essential

        3. Further viewing 5 items
          1. [Please note: students are expected to watch AT LEAST one additional viewing in their own time in preparation for this week]

          2. Tokyo-Ga - Wim Wenders 1985

            Webpage recommended

          3. Mystery train - Jim Jarmusch, Youki Koduh, Masatoshi Nagase, Screamin' Jay Hawkins 1993 (videorecording)

            Audio-visual document recommended

          4. 35 rhums: 35 shots of rum - Claire Denis, Bruno Pesery, Jean-Pol Fargeau, Alex Descas 2008 (videorecording =)

            Audio-visual document recommended

          5. Still walking - Hirokazu Kore-eda, Hiroshi Abe, Yui Natsukawa, Kirin Kiki 2008 (videorecording)

            Audio-visual document recommended

        4. Essential reading 3 items
          1. Is Ozu Slow? - Jonathan Rosenbaum 2000

            Webpage essential

        5. Further reading 11 items
          1. The cinema of Wim Wenders: the celluloid highway - Alexander Graf 2002

            Book further reading Please read: Chapter 3, esp. section on Tokyo-Ga, pp. 105-112.

          2. No man an island: the cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien - James Udden c2009

            Book further reading Please read: Conclusion: Hou in the New Millenium, pp. 163-186, especially section on Café Lumière.

          3. Slow cinema 2016

            Book further reading Please read: Justin Remes (2015) ‘The Sleeping Spectator: Non-human Aesthetics in Abbas Kiarostami’s Five Dedicated to Ozu’, pp. 231-244.

          4. Open roads, closed borders: the contemporary French-language road movie - Michael Gott, Thibaut Schilt, Laura Rascaroli 2013

            Book further reading Please read: Michelle Royer and Miriam Thompson ‘Mobility and Exile in Claire Denis’s 35 Rhums’, pp. 187-203.

          5. East Asian cinemas: regional flows and global transformations - Vivian P. Y. Lee 2011

            Book further reading Please read: Song Hwee Lim (2011) ‘Transnational Trajectories in Contemporary East Asian Cinemas’.

          6. Slow cinema 2016

            Book further reading Please read: Tiago de Luca & Nuno Barradas Jorge ‘Introduction: From Slow Cinema to Slow Cinemas’, pp. 1-24.

          7. Ozu international: essays on the global influences of a Japanese auteur 2015 (electronic resource)

            Book further reading Please read: Tom Paulus (2015) ‘In Yoko's Room: Hou, Ozu, and the Poetics of Space’.

          8. Hollywood puzzle films 2014

            Book further reading Please read: William Brown (2014) ‘Complexity and Simplicity in Inception and Five Dedicated to Ozu’, pp. 1-10.

          9. Ozu international: essays on the global influences of a Japanese auteur 2015 (electronic resource)

            Book further reading Please read: Introduction, pp. 1-10.

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